Lions prepare for Titans

Run Game Will be key

The Detroit Lions (1-0, tied 1st, NFC North) will be looking to go 2-0  when they face the Tennessee Titans (0-1, 4th AFC South) this Sunday with the running duo of Theo Riddick and Ameer Abdullah who combined for 107 yards on 19 carries.  Both caught enough passes to go over the 100 total yard mark.

Although the Titans showed last week that they can control the run, holding Adrian Peterson to 31 yards on 19 carries, Matt Stafford should be able to keep the defense honest with the run game which will allow him to have another fantastic throwing day.  Against the Vikings, Stafford showed poise and leadership en route to a 31-for-38 passing for 340 yards and three touchdowns kinda day.

lions-5“When he’s in command and running things, he puts a lot of pressure on the defense. He doesn’t give them much time. And he’s been very, very accurate. When things are a bit spread out, he spreads it around,” Coach Jim Caldwell of Stafford.

The game kicks off at noon and plenty of great seats and affordable tickets are still available so be sure to grab yours today and help cheer on your Detroit Lions on Sunday!

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Lions prep for Vikings

After losing a close game at home to the Buffalo Bills 17-14, the Detroit Lions (3-2)  are preparing to hit the road as they face the 2-3 Minnesota Vikings.

The Vikings are coming off a 10-42 blowout at the hands of the Green Bay Packers and are looking to pick up their second home victory of the season.

Plenty of great seats and cheap tickets are still available so be sure to get yours now!

Lions travel to Arizona to face Cardinals

The Detroit Lions, fresh off their 10-point victory over the Minnesota Vikings, now travel to Arizona to face the 0-1 Cardinals.  The Cards fell to the Rams in a close 24-27 loss to the Rams.

Reggie Bush looked like the Bush of yesteryear with an effective running game that produce 25 touches for 191 yards and the coaching staff expects more of the same this week.

“Reggie’s a tough guy,” coach Jim Schwartz said. “You’re a running back in the NFL, there’s going to be some Mondays where you’re not going to be feeling great. Feel a little bit better when you get the win and when you make the plays that he made. That’s what we’re looking for from him.”

Tickets are still available for Sundays match up.

Bush is the key to Lions Super Bowl goals

When the Detroit Lions went after running back Reggie Bush in the Spring, it was a full court press that found Bush sitting in a private plane across from Head Coach Jim Schwartz, Offensive Coordinator Scott Linehan and most importantly Quarterback Matthew Stafford.  It was an offer  hard to turn down but more than that, it was an opportunity to return to greatness.

“We talked the whole plane ride,” Bush said Wednesday as the Lions prepare for the season-opener against Minnesota. “They just kind of showed me how wide open some of these running lanes are because of the way they have to play Calvin and because of the way defenses are so worried about the passing offense.

The addition of Bush to the backfield will force opposing defenses to play honest and not blitz Stafford so much.

“I just feel like this is maybe my best opportunity yet,” Bush said

“He can take a short pass and make a big play out of it,” Schwartz said. “I like what he can provide in the run game but also in the pass game. He’s a weapon … he has the ability to take it to the house every time he touches the ball.”

The Lions take on the Minnesota Vikings this Sunday at 1 p.m. Tickets are still available

 

Minnesota suburb pitches new Vikings stadium


NFL: Notebook

Associated Press

Arden Hills, Minn. — Officials in a Twin Cities suburb said Tuesday they have reached an agreement with the Minnesota Vikings to lure the NFL team away from their longtime home in Minneapolis with a retractable-roof stadium built on a Superfund site.

The site of the stadium would be the former Twin Cities Army Ammunitions Plant property in Arden Hills, about 10 miles from the Metrodome in Minneapolis. The agreement calls for an $884 million stadium and an additional $173 million for on-site infrastructure, parking and environmental costs.

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Ramsey County said the Vikings will commit $407 million to the project — 44 percent of the stadium costs and 39 percent of the overall costs. The county’s share would be $350 million, to be financed by a half-cent sales tax increase.

Ramsey County Commissioner Tony Bennett, whose district includes the site, said in a news release that the proposed project would “turn an environmental liability into an asset, clean up the largest Superfund site in the state, return property to the tax rolls, put people to work and provide for much-needed transportation infrastructure upgrades.”

The announcement comes one day after Minneapolis officials pitched a plan to keep the team downtown. It also came just hours after Gov. Mark Dayton said fixing up roads near the Arden Hills site would likely cost at least $175 million and up to $240 million if it includes restaurants, hotels and other amenities.

Still, Dayton said he could support either site as long as the state share doesn’t exceed $300 million.

The Vikings have been pressing for a new stadium for years, but the team

The stadium discussion had been largely put off at the Capitol as legislators struggle to resolve a $5 billion state deficit. It picked up speed last week, with Dayton saying he had met privately with owners Zygi and Mark Wilf and he was ready to sign a stadium bill.

Extra points

Eight-time All-Pro guard Alan Faneca , 34, announced his retirement after 13 seasons with the Steelers, Jets and Cardinals.

He was the Steelers first-round pick out of LSU in 1998.

… Ravens rookie linebacker Sergio Kindle has pleaded guilty to a drunken driving charge in Baltimore, and sentenced to one year with all but five days suspended.

Bob Wojnowski: Lions were big winners in Ford Field game


Bob Wojnowski

Detroit— This was strange, in every way. There was Brett Favre, standing on the home sideline at Ford Field, purple all around, the Vikings horn blaring.

And here was the really strange part: Favre wasn’t in uniform.

What began as a nice gesture by the Lions, to let the Vikings move in because their stadium had a hole in the roof, became shaded by a significant twist of drama. Detroit has been home to some bizarre football history, and now it can add this: It’s where Favre’s NFL-record playing streak ended.

It also could be where Favre’s starry (and lately, tedious) story finally ends, because with an injured right shoulder, who knows if he’ll play again. The Giants beat the Vikings 21-3 before 45,910 enthusiastic fans at Ford Field, which pulled off a flawless hosting effort.

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Darn that Favre, huh? He has spent most of his 20-year career beating the Lions, and the one time — one time— he doesn’t play in their stadium, the Lions aren’t the opponent. (Add creepy curse music).

Afterward, Favre sounded like a guy who finally might have seen the end of his career. He wasn’t willing to say it was over, with three games left in a miserable 5-8 season, but clearly, it’s a distinct possibility now that the streak is over.

“I won’t say it was time, but it probably was long overdue — there’s probably a lot of times the streak should’ve ended,” Favre said. “It’s been a great run. I will not hang my head one bit.”

If it ended here, well, quite a few Detroiters will say they were there. Give Detroit football fans and the Lions organization, led by president Tom Lewand, tremendous credit for putting on a great show on short notice. Fans lined up early in the morning for free tickets, and within 60 minutes, nearly 30,000 were gone. The crowd was festive and energetic, and actually seemed inclined to provide a true home-field advantage for the Vikings.

I could argue the Lions have served as accommodating hosts to division rivals for a long time, but that’s just mean. And already outdated. The Lions snapped their 19-game losing streak against NFC North foes the previous day with a 7-3 win over Green Bay, and the party kept right on going.

Favre’s mistake

It was a weird, cool and contemplative scene, the first Monday night game at Ford Field. Some will muster sympathy for Favre, the 41-year-old legend who returned one time too many. His streak of 297 consecutive starts is beyond amazing, launched in 1992.

But frankly, what a horrible mistake this comeback was, and Favre insists his retirement will stick after this season. Too bad it didn’t stick the last time. He helped push out coach Brad Childress and threw a league-high 18 interceptions while battling foot and elbow injuries. Oh, Favre also was involved in a bawdy little controversy for allegedly texting suggestive messages to a female who didn’t happen to be his wife.

It’s probably blessed intervention he sat out Monday night, because the Giants’ defense steamrolled Tarvaris Jackson. Favre said he had no regrets about returning this season, and really no regrets about how the streak ended. He had numbness and tingling in his right hand and simply couldn’t play.

“I think it’d be foolish to even consider playing if you don’t have feeling in five fingers,” Favre said. “I’ll see how I feel this week and go from there.”

Students of coincidental facts will note Lou Gehrig’s then-record streak of 2,130 consecutive major-league games ended in Detroit in 1939. This didn’t have the same somber nobility, although it had a similar cause: The body broke down.

Favre had hoped the extra day of rest, as the Vikings and Giants dodged snowstorms, might allow him to play. But he reportedly sported a golf-ball-sized knot on his right shoulder, the result of a hit the previous week against Buffalo, and it caused the numbness.

The decision to sit ultimately was an easy one for Favre and Vikings coach Leslie Frazier, who called it a “no-brainer.” It sure didn’t seem to faze the crowd, which added to the atmosphere. The Vikings’ fight song blared, “Vikings” was stenciled in purple in both end zones and the braided, horned Vikings guy was painted at midfield.

Lions good hosts

The Giants dominated, but it didn’t really matter. The crowd unleashed a few “Let’s go Lions!” cheers and helped make this a perfectly solid success. There were worries early in the day, when thousands of fans lined up outside Ford Field. People began to wonder if the free-ticket, general-admission gesture was such a good idea.

But the Lions handled it fine, not a surprise considering the raves for the 2006 Super Bowl here. Lewand said owner William Clay Ford insisted on accessibility for fans, hence the freebies. The Lions had to cut off the giveaway at 30,000 in case a lot of ticket stubs were used from the Lions-Packers game, as was permitted. That precautionary move probably was the only reason Ford Field wasn’t full.

As the game began, Lewand was beaming, and the NFL was lauding the Lions’ effort.

“It’s a great testament to our fans and a great testament to the NFL,” Lewand said. “I’ve talked to both teams and they’re very happy.”

When the gates opened about two hours before the 7:20 p.m. kickoff, fans hustled in and raced to the best seats. Their faces were red from the cold, their anticipation was obvious.

“I can’t run — my feet are frozen!” one guy yelled and laughed at the same time.

It was that kind of night, when emotions got jumbled and team colors got blurred. Detroit fans came for a show and put on a show, as one of the NFL’s longest-running shows ended. One more time, Favre was the spotlight story, written on a rollicking night when things seemed out of place, starting with the old quarterback on the sideline.